christina-wocintechchat-com-LQ1t-8Ms5PY-unsplash.jpg

WHY LISTENING MATTERS & HOW TO DO IT WELL

Talking with someone who has different opinions from you will test your patience and your stamina. Check out some of these resources if you want to explore why listening is hard, how to do it and why it's worth it in the end.

Feminist Prof. Loretta J. Ross Is Done With Cancel Culture | Amanpour and Company
18:16

Feminist Prof. Loretta J. Ross Is Done With Cancel Culture | Amanpour and Company

Creating conversations to bridge differences is hard enough, but online it can be even tougher -- especially when one perceived misstep can see someone “called out” or “cancelled.” These two things can close down dialogue without addressing the problem, according to Loretta J. Ross. She tells Michel Martin about a class she's teaching on this subject at Smith College. Originally aired on November 24, 2020. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to the Amanpour and Company. channel here: https://bit.ly/2EMIkTJ Subscribe to our daily newsletter to find out who's on each night: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/amanpour-and-company/newsletter/ For more from Amanpour and Company, including full episodes, click here: https://to.pbs.org/2NBFpjf Like Amanpour and Company on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2HNx3EF Follow Amanpour and Company on Twitter: https://bit.ly/2HLpjTI Watch Amanpour and Company weekdays on PBS (check local listings). Amanpour and Company features wide-ranging, in-depth conversations with global thought leaders and cultural influencers on the issues and trends impacting the world each day, from politics, business and technology to arts, science and sports. Christiane Amanpour leads the conversation on global and domestic news from London with contributions by prominent journalists Walter Isaacson, Michel Martin, Alicia Menendez and Hari Sreenivasan from the Tisch WNET Studios at Lincoln Center in New York City. #amanpourpbs
Why I, as a black man, attend KKK rallies. | Daryl Davis | TEDxNaperville
18:53

Why I, as a black man, attend KKK rallies. | Daryl Davis | TEDxNaperville

A chance encounter with members of the Ku Klux Klan led black musician Daryl Davis on a quest to determine the source of the hate. His unorthodox, yet simple approach, has wielded surprising results and just might be the solution for all racial discourse. Daryl Davis graduated from Howard University with a degree in Jazz. As a pianist, vocalist, and guitarist, he performs nationally and internationally with The Daryl Davis Band. He has also worked with such notables as Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley’s Jordanaires, The Legendary Blues Band, and many others. In 1983, A chance occurrence after one of his performances led him to befriend a member of the Ku Klux Klan. This eventually led Daryl to become the first black author to travel the country interviewing KKK leaders and members, all detailed in his book, Klan-Destine Relationships. Today, Daryl owns numerous Klan robes and hoods, given to him by active members who became his friends and renounced the organization. Since his journey began, Davis has joined an all-white country band, attended KKK rallies, and accepted a “certificate of friendship” from the Traditionalist American Knights of the KKK. He’s even the godfather of former Klan Imperial Wizard Roger Kelly’s granddaughter. Davis has received the Elliott-Black and MLK awards as well as numerous other local and national awards for his work in race relations, and is often sought by media outlets as a consultant on the KKK and race relations. He is also an actor with stage and screen credits, appearing in the critically acclaimed HBO police drama, The Wire, and most recently, as the subject of the documentary Accidental Courtesy, which filmed his real life encounters with Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi leaders as he helps to dismantle racism across the United States Davis has received the Elliott-Black and MLK awards as well as numerous other local and national awards for his work in race relations, and is often sought by media outlets as a consultant on the KKK and race relations. He is also an actor with stage and screen credits, appearing in the critically acclaimed HBO police drama, The Wire, and most recently, as the subject of the documentary Accidental Courtesy, which filmed his real life encounters with Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi leaders as he helps to dismantle racism across the United States. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
How to keep conversation alive in a polarized world | Jason Jay | TEDxBocaRaton
17:17

How to keep conversation alive in a polarized world | Jason Jay | TEDxBocaRaton

In our polarized world, it is easy for conversations to get stuck. How can we find new pathways forward on the big issues of our time, whether at the holiday dinner table, in our organizations, or on the wider political stage? Facilitator and author Jason Jay from MIT Sloan explores what happens inside ourselves when conversations go off the rails. He offers a tool called transformative contrasting to help people get unstuck and even harness the creative energy of polarization. Jason Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. His research focuses on how people navigate the tensions between personal, business, and social goals in sustainability efforts. His first book is Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World and he has published articles in the Academy of Management Journal and California Management Review. He teaches courses on strategy, innovation, and leadership for sustainable business at MIT, and engages students and alumni in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP and the World Bank. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

RECOMMENDED READING

"How Can You Hate Me When You Don't Even Know Me?" – Nicholas Kristof, The New York Times

"Is America Hopelessly Polarized, or Just Allergic to Politics?" – Samara Klar, Yanna Krupnikov and John Barry Ryan, The New York Times

"Abortion, Guns, and Trump: A Church Group Tries to Navigate America's Divisions" – Janet Adamy, The Wall Street Journal

"How to Have Better Arguments Online" – Ian Leslie, The Guardian

"How a Danish Town Helped Young Muslims Turn Away from ISIS" – Hanna Rosin, NPR

"Your Ideas Are Not Your Identity" – Adam Grant, Behavioral Scientist

"What if Instead of Calling People Out, We Called Them In?" – Jessica Bennet, The New York Times

OTHERS WHO DO GREAT WORK